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From the Pacific Northwest to Eastern Europe... join my on the journey.
"The Battle on the Walls," by Constantine Zuev.  Located somewhere near the Dominican Cathedral.

"The Battle on the Walls," by Constantine Zuev.  Located somewhere near the Dominican Cathedral.

Stryiskiy Rynok

I walk past, around, through this busy market and intersection every day.  On my way to the bus stop in the morning, I run over the cobblestones to beat the light, and then I weave through the flower market, surrounded by men unloading trucks and emptying vases of water on the sidewalk, women arranging bouquets and weaving traditional wreaths.  Everything is fresh, moving, bright.

Inside the market, babusyas shaded by umbrellas sell vegetables, whole animals, homemade salads and pickles, handpicked berries, fresh eggs and milk, apricots from Spain.  Tiny shops sell cookies, baking supplies, and cuts of meat.  There are tables of sausages and “home” cheese, and old women standing with jars of fruit, calling softly to each passerby to try a piece. They love to talk; they tell me about daughters and grand-daughters studying in America, how prettily I speak Ukrainian, that their strawberries and cherries are fresh and sweet.

mylvivmoodboard:

02.07.2012 
one of many courtyards
Lviv, near Rynok square

mylvivmoodboard:

02.07.2012 

one of many courtyards

Lviv, near Rynok square

On July 4 alone, when the opposition was rallying in the streets and boycotting parliamentary hearings, a total of 20 laws, 2 rulings and 7 drafts were passed that might become highly damaging for state finances. To make matters worse, video footage of that day clearly shows that there were only 73 deputies physically present in the session hall, pressing buttons for their neighbors to come up with the required 226 vote majority – an act deemed illegal by the Constitution and a number of laws.
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You know you've been in Ukraine too long when...

  • You’re not scared of the street dogs.
  • You understand that if you put your girlfriend’s handbag on the table or (god forbid) the floor – she will probably leave you.
  • You can pronounce Dnipropetrovsk without having a seizure.
  • You walk past a litter bin which is on fire and has flames coming out of it, and you think its normal.
  • You have forgotten that the fur industry is cruel and inhumane and started to think that fur is glamorous.
  • You go into an Italian restaurant and expect to be able to order Japanese food.
  • You have forgotten how to use definitive article.
  • You are not surprised by anything and you dismiss everything by shrugging your shoulders and saying, “It’s Ukraine.”

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